End of US highway 199

View a map showing this route.

Photo credits: Chris Elbert

Approx. time period North terminus South terminus
1926-1940s Grants Pass, OR (Redwood Jct) Crescent City, CA (Northcrest Dr)
1940s-1965 Grants Pass, OR (Redwood Jct) Crescent City, CA (English Ln)
1965-present Grants Pass, OR (I-5) Crescent City, CA (101 freeway)

The north end of US 199 has been at Grants Pass OR since the US routes were originally commissioned in 1926. However, the exact endpoint has changed a bit - you can view photos and get more info on this page.


The south end of US 199 has always been at its junction with US 101 in Crescent City CA. Of course, US 101 traffic didn't initially use today's freeway. Chris and I think it originally came south via what is now designated County Road D3, which becomes Northcrest Drive in town. US 199 probably came in on Parkway Drive, which aligns with modern US 101 south of Washington Boulevard. So US 199 would've ended on today's US 101 at Northcrest Drive. The photo below is looking north on US 101:

Elbert, Oct. 2006

Today US 101 continues straight ahead, and as you can see from the green sign in the distance, the modern junction with US 199 is three miles ahead. But originally US 101 probably went left here on Northcrest, and straight ahead would've been the south beginning of US 199.

By the mid-1940s it appears US 101 had been rerouted to its current alignment southward as far as today's junction with US 199. From that point, it probably continued south on what is now English Lane, then followed Parkway southwest into town. So then US 199 would've ended on Parkway at English. Below we're looking south on Parkway:

Elbert, Oct. 2006

Originally this was all US 199, and it ended at US 101 in town, about three miles ahead. But later US 101 was rerouted such that it came in from the right on English, and then continued ahead. So US 199 was probably truncated to end at this intersection. Today, turning right on English is not a through road - it was vacated when the US 101 freeway was built. I don't know when that was (for now I'm saying 1965). Whenever it was built was probably also when US 199 was rerouted to its current terminus. The photo below shows the spot:

Elbert, Mar. 2005

By the time of Chris' next visit, the panel on the right had been replaced:

Elbert, July 2012

Not sure why both panels weren't replaced, and it's kind of sad to see that old button copy go. Anyway, there are no ramps that directly connect to northbound US 101; a right turn ahead puts you on a connector road. That same connector is used by southbound 101 traffic wanting northbound US 199 (that's why it says "TO US 199"):

Elbert, Mar. 2005

Ahead at the turn itself is a newer sign:

Elbert, Mar. 2005

If you take that turn, there's a confirming marker on the connector road...

Elbert, Mar. 2005

...and finally you come to a stopsign at mainline US 199:

Elbert, Mar. 2005

It's not so complicated heading north on US 101:

Elbert, Mar. 2005

More button copy has now bitten the dust...

Elbert, July 2012

...but again: why only the right panel? The confirming marker on the offramp is shown close-up below...

Elbert, Mar. 2005

...but that too has since been replaced with something a little more to spec:

Elbert, July 2012

The photo below shows the first confirming marker on mainline US 199:

Elbert, Mar. 2005

Chris reports that the highway immediately enters the redwood forest visible in the background, and makes for a scenic drive through canyons and over passes all the way into Oregon.