End of US highway 75

View a map showing this route.

Additional research and/or photo credits: Justin Cozart, Nathan Edgars; Karin and Martin Karner; Jeff Morrison, Steven Nelson; Stephen Taylor

Approx. time period North terminus South terminus
1926-1987 Noyes, MN Galveston, TX
1987-present Noyes, MN Dallas, TX

Ever since the US routes were first commissioned in 1926, the north end of US 75 has been at the Canada port of entry between Noyes MN and Emerson MB. That remains the case (US 75 is still signed to the border as of 2007), but since 2003 that border crossing has been closed:

Nelson, Apr. 2005

From what I've been able to find, it was actually Canada that closed their side of the port in 2003, citing such factors as the age of the facility, the proximity of another port, and workload and resource considerations. And apparently the port is still open to train traffic. So theoretically I suppose the U.S. could've opted to continue letting automobile traffic come in from Manitoba via the Port of Noyes (even though people could no longer leave the U.S. that way). But most of the reasons Canada cited also apply to the U.S. At any rate, it appears the U.S. "unofficially" closed the Port of Noyes at the same time Canada closed its port, but it wasn't until 2006 that Noyes was procedurally and legally closed.

Since 2003, Canada-bound traffic on US 75 has been directed to follow MN hwy. 171 west into North Dakota, where it becomes ND hwy. 59, which joins I-29 at interchange 215. But so far, it appears that Minnesota and North Dakota have not yet petitioned AASHTO to change the definition of US 75 to follow that routing. As of 2007, US 75 was still signed to what's now a dead-end at the old border crossing:

Morrison, May 2007

The white sign in the background is shown close-up below:

Morrison, May 2007

Drivers are clearly informed that they should cross over to Pembina and use the I-29 port of entry. But I don't see the point in continuing to sign US 75 north from this junction. Anyway, the photo below shows the north end of US 75:

Morrison, May 2007

That's the Port of Noyes, now closed. Ahead is Mantioba hwy. 75, which continues into Winnipeg. The backside of the sign in the foreground is shown in the photo below:

Morrison, May 2007

That says "International Historic Highway 75 - King of Trails". It's too bad this port has closed, because this historic highway association has done a good job of signing and promoting US 75. The first mention of US 75 is ahead at the junction with MN 171, and the first southbound marker is posted just beyond there:

Nelson, Apr. 2005


Originally US 75 went all the way down to Galveston TX. South of Dallas, it essentially followed what is now the I-45 corridor. US 75 reached its southernmost point where it landed on Galveston Island - from there, it turned east (but also slightly north) along what was then Avenue J (now Broadway, or TX 87). Exactly where US 75 ended is a bit uncertain, but Stephen Taylor makes a good case for the intersection with 20th Street. Although that's not a major north-south road in town, TXDoT maps as early as 1940 seem to place some significance on this intersection, by marking it with an asterisk and using it as a mileage point-of-reference. Below is a clip from their 1961 map:

As you can see, the highway markers seem to back up Stephen's theory. The photo below is looking west on Broadway at 20th:

Google Maps Street View, 2008

At one time, that may have been the end of TX 87, and US 75 began straight ahead. On the other hand, it's possible that US 75 extended to the east end of Broadway - certainly by the 1970s, it appears US 75 ended at Seawall Boulevard:

Google Maps Street View, 2008

That's looking east on Broadway - for a time, US 75 ended here, with TX 87 signage beginning where the road curves left to become Seawall. (Straight ahead is the large sign at the entrance to Stewart Beach, one of the large public beaches on Galveston Island.) Here's a shot from the opposite perspective:

Google Maps Street View, 2008

The view there is southwest on Seawall. This is where TX 87 signage used to end, while US 75 began where the road curves into Broadway (to the right, behind the orange sign). Just over 4 miles that direction is the south beginning of I-45. It was in 1987 that TXDoT decided US 75 south of Dallas had finally been rendered obsolete by I-45. So the TX 87 designation was extended west along Broadway, replacing US 75, and ending where I-45 began (and this is the arrangement currently in place). But you can still drive most of old US 75 in Texas, including the segment that's now marked as TX hwy. 75 from Streetman to Conroe.


Already by the time of the 1987 TXDoT map, US 75 was shown cut back to its current south terminus in Dallas. The photo below is looking south at the end of US 75 (and secret I-345) at I-30:

Karners, Jan. 2012

Below is the signage heading the opposite direction (north at the end of I-45 and the south beginning of US 75/I-345):

Cozart, Dec. 2002

In August 2007, these panels were replaced with Clearview versions, and the control city for US 75 was changed from "Sherman" to "McKinney":

Karners, Jan. 2012

Also, the interstate shields are more compliant now. And here is the beginning as seen from westbound I-30:

Cozart, Dec. 2002

From eastbound I-30, US 75 and I-45 traffic is directed onto a C-D road; the photo below shows where the two destinations split:

Cozart, Aug. 2007

If you follow the left fork, the first US 75 sign on the mainline looks like this:

Cozart, Aug. 2007