End of US highway 14

View a map showing this route.

Additional research and/or photo credits: Monte Castleman; Tom Grier; Don Hargraves; Matt Majewski; Andrew Munsch; Greg Osbaldeston; Jim Teresco; me

Approx. time period East terminus West terminus
1926-1928 Winona, MN (Broadway) Phillip Jct. SD
1928-1929 Winona, MN (Broadway) (near Spearfish, SD)
1929-1932 Winona, MN (Junction) Rapid City, SD
1932-1933 Winona, MN (Junction) Phillip Jct. SD
1933-1934 Chicago, IL (Addison) Phillip Jct. SD
1934-1935 Chicago, IL (Addison) Cody, WY (?)
1935-1938 Chicago, IL (Addison) East entrance Yellowstone National Park, WY
1938-1952 Chicago, IL (Broadway) East entrance Yellowstone National Park, WY
1952-1978 Chicago, IL (Michigan) East entrance Yellowstone National Park, WY
1978-present Chicago, IL (Broadway) East entrance Yellowstone National Park, WY

US 14 was an original 1926 route, but at the time its east end was at US 61 in Winona MN. The photo below is looking south on modern US 61...

Teresco, Oct. 2004

...and although this junction serves as today's functional equivalent, this is a newer bypass of sorts around Winona, and it hadn't yet been built back when US 14 ended here. Originally US 61 followed what is now CR 32 through Goodview, but shortly after entering Winona it curved to head east on 6th Street (or Broadway). That curve has since been vacated, but most of the old concrete roadway still exists. Meanwhile, US 14 split off today's route by going east on Gilmore Street (via a bridge that no longer exists), then north on Vila, ending at Broadway (US 61). The photo below is looking south on Vila:

Grier, July 2006

US 61 traffic used the crossroad (Broadway/6th), and the east beginning of US 14 was straight ahead. (Incidentally, the bluffs visible in the background mark the edge of the Mississippi River floodplain, in which Winona is situated.) That only lasted about two years; in 1929 the remainder of today's CR 32 was built: Junction Street down to Gilmore. US 61 was rerouted to follow that, then east on Gilmore, and then 13th Street (or Sarnia Street). So US 14 was truncated by about a mile, ending on Gilmore at Junction. The photo below is looking west on Gilmore:

Munsch, Oct. 2007

That was northbound US 61, which curved to the right on Junction. Straight ahead was the east beginning of US 14 until 1933. After that, US 14 was extended eastward via southbound US 61. The two routes don't diverge again until Readstown WI (about 76 miles distant).


Early maps make it look like no one quite knew what to do with the west end of US 14: it wasn't until about 1934 that it was assigned a routing through the Black Hills distinct from US 16 (or more accurately, US 16 was rerouted to go through the Hills, while US 14 was given US 16's old path around the north edge of the Hills). Originally US 14 ended at a lonely junction with US 16 outside Phillip SD. I photographed that spot in March 2004; click here to view photos and more info.


Two years later, the US 14 designation may have been extended west with US 16 to the SD/WY state line near Spearfish. Even if so, that was the west terminus of US 14 only briefly, because the next year the designation was truncated to Rapid City. It's difficult to speculate exactly where signage would've ended there, but my guess is that the terminus would've been at the same intersection where US 216 ended. You can view photos from there on this page.


In 1932 the west end of US 14 was back at Phillip Jct; and in 1934 it was extended either to Rapid City again or to Cody WY (you can view photos from there on this page). In 1938 US 14 was extended west again, this time to the east entrance of Yellowstone National Park, where it remains to this day (you can view photos from there on this page).


Now, back to the east end: as I said, it was 1933 when the east end of US 14 was extended to Chicago. Traffic came in on Addison Street, and state highway maps from 1934 through 1938 (scan below courtesy of Neil Bratney) seem to indicate that US 14 ended at its junction with US 12/41 (Lake Shore Drive):

The photo below is looking east on Addison at Lake Shore:

Hargraves

That was the original Chicago endpoint of US 14. The next shot is a view up westbound Addison, at the former beginning of US 14...

Hargraves

...but that was the situation for only about four years. The 1939 map shows US 14 coming in on Broadway and ending at Foster Avenue. Yep, same intersection where US 14 ends today. We'll see photos from there below, but first I want to note: that junction hasn't been a continuous endpoint since 1939. The first time, US 14 ended there only until 1952. The 1953 map shows that US 14 had been extended down to a common endpoint with US 54 (you can view photos from there on this page). That was the case until 1978; the 1979 map was the first to show US 14 back at its Broadway/Foster endpoint, where it remains to this day:

Osbaldeston, June 2000

That's looking south on Broadway at Foster. The photo below is looking east on Foster:

Majewski, Aug. 2011

US 14 begins to the north on Broadway. Below we're heading the opposite direction (west on Foster):

Majewski, Aug. 2011

If you turn right on Broadway, you're at the east beginning of US 14, and you're greeted with the sign shown below:

Hargraves

If you keep following US 14 from there, you'll intersect US 41 again in a couple miles.